Latest News About - Equine encephalitis

 
Show/hide duplicate news articles.
Filter by countryfromabout
<<10<12345678910>>>10
 
Show/hide duplicate news articles.
<<10<12345678910>>>10

Tools

Load latest edition

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

5:23:00 PM CEST

Subscribe
RSS | MAP

Language Selection

For any category/filter, users can choose:

  1. the language of the categorized news items (e.g. fr and de to display only those news items in French and German)
  2. the language of the user interface (e.g. it for Italian)

In Top Stories, the user can display the largest clusters of news items for one language only (e.g. en shows all clusters in English)

Country Selection

Users can choose:

  1. country mentioned in the news item (articles about a country)
  2. country in which the news item was published (articles from a country)

Languages Collapse menu...Expand menu...Open help...

Select your languages

ar
az
be
bg
bs
ca
cs
da
de
el
en
eo
es
et
fa
fi
fr
ga
ha
he
hi
hr
hu
hy
id
is
it
ja
ka
km
ko
ku
ky
lb
lo
lt
lv
mk
ml
mn
ms
mt
nl
no
pap
pl
ps
pt
ro
ru
rw
se
si
sk
sl
sq
sr
sv
sw
ta
th
tr
uk
ur
vi
zh
all
Show additional languagesHide additional languages

Interface:

Most reported countries (24h)

Theme countries

AlertLevel (24h)

Alert level graph

 Previous 14 days average

Alert level:
 high   medium   low

Quotes... Extracted quotes

John Shepard said: “We continue to collect mosquitoes at levels which are above average for this time of year,” External link

ctpost Tuesday, July 16, 2019 10:36:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “Hot summers without drought are always important for breeding the most mosquitoes, but rainfall can also confound issues depending on its variability and intensity,” “Large deluge storms can flush out mosquito larvae that were previously developing happily in ponds and filled ditches” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “Mosquito species certainly can become ‘invasive’ and colonize new habitats,” “An example of this is Aedes albopictus that has invaded the southeastern U.S. and many other subtropical areas around the globe. It is a vector of Zika virus, chikungunya virus, and dengue viruses that are currently causing pandemics (widespread illness) in humans. Human movement (think cars, planes, and trains) has probably transferred C. tarsalis to the eastern United States innumerable times over the last hundred-plus years, but it has never taken hold, possibly because it isn’t able to adapt to that habitat” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “Susceptible hatchlings that can’t fly have poor defensive behavior against biting mosquitoes,” “These individuals often develop high viremia (virus levels in the blood) because they have no immunity” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “Disease from WNV is especially concentrated in the Great Plains, mostly due to the very efficient C. tarsalis vector, along with a limited diversity of bird species that it likes to bite,” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “Larvae of many mosquito species in the mountains and northern states grow in melting snow pools in the spring, can tolerate being frozen for a bit, and emerge as adults in early to middle summer,” “On the Plains, Culex tarsalis develops in spring rain puddles, but doesn’t emerge in large numbers until around late June, depending on the temperature” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “Some scientists are explaining this trend by suggesting summer warming linked to climate change, which could directly influence mosquito species abundance,” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “The mosquito vectors and the host species they bite are what usually define the endemic regions of all arboviruses,” “WEE in the USA is mostly transmitted by C. tarsalis mosquitoes limited to the states west of the Mississippi River, where they proliferate on the Great Plains” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Brian Foy says: “WNV is not just transmitted by one type of mosquito,” External link

thehorse Monday, June 24, 2019 2:43:00 PM CEST

Ute Mackenstedt added: "For the population to expand, a male and a female tick would have to find each other. This is very difficult with such a small number" External link

thesun Wednesday, June 19, 2019 2:34:00 PM CEST

Ute Mackenstedt said (about Ute Mackenstedt): "According to the latest evidence, we have to presume that these animals are able to survive the winters in Germany. The Hyalomma ticks can grow to as long as two centimetres, substantially larger than the local common wood tick. They are recognised by their unusual size and their striped legs. Until now, Hyalomma ticks were thought to have been brought to Germany by migratory birds. However, Mackenstedt believes that this cannot have been the case this year, saying: " External link

dailystar Wednesday, June 19, 2019 1:56:00 PM CEST

Most associated names

Daily number of articles in this category

Trend data not available for this selection.