Latest News About - Eastern Equine Encephalitis

 
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James Morris said: "There are a number of questions about how the parasite grows and develops in the fly and then gets transmitted to humans and other mammals," External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "One of the key things that happens is that, as the parasite is floating around in (mammalian) blood, it perceives its neighbors and says 'oh, there are a lot of us,' and becomes a different form that is ready to go into a fly, if the fly were to happen to bite that person," "That form that's ready for life in the fly doesn't grow -- it's not a growing form -- it's really sitting there, waiting to be taken up by a fly. Once it passes into the fly, though, it begins to grow again. It becomes a form that can live in the fly, and that's the insect-stage form, or procyclic form" External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "What has been a mystery, and still is a mystery, is how the parasite really knows where it is," "It turns out that if you take the form that lives in the fly and inject it into a mammal, it is killed instantly by the mammal's immune system. So, the parasite really has to do an excellent job of recognizing its environment" External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "We've always suspected the sugar was the cause, but it's been hard to prove," External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "We felt, wouldn't it be interesting if the parasite is monitoring that sugar to know when it has moved into a fly, because when there's lots of sugar, the parasite thinks 'I'm in a mammal,' and when there's no sugar, the parasite thinks 'oh, I'm in a fly'," "We found that if you take the parasites and remove glucose nearly completely, they're still alive, which was: A, very surprising because they're so reliant on the sugar; but B, they also then quickly changed into the form that can live in the fly" External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "That's the first step in understanding that pathway and trying to confuse the parasite with drugs later," External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "The problem really is that in animals it's unchecked, and it has a really catastrophic effect on agriculture and those pursuits in sub-Saharan Africa," External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "We want to exploit this new understanding," External link

sciencedaily Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:48:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "There are a number of questions about how the parasite grows and develops in the fly and then gets transmitted to humans and other mammals," External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "One of the key things that happens is that, as the parasite is floating around in (mammalian) blood, it perceives its neighbors and says 'oh, there are a lot of us,' and becomes a different form that is ready to go into a fly, if the fly were to happen to bite that person," "That form that's ready for life in the fly doesn't grow - it's not a growing form - it's really sitting there, waiting to be taken up by a fly. Once it passes into the fly, though, it begins to grow again. It becomes a form that can live in the fly, and that's the insect-stage form, or procyclic form" External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "What has been a mystery, and still is a mystery, is how the parasite really knows where it is," "It turns out that if you take the form that lives in the fly and inject it into a mammal, it is killed instantly by the mammal's immune system. So, the parasite really has to do an excellent job of recognizing its environment" External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "We've always suspected the sugar was the cause, but it's been hard to prove," External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "We felt, wouldn't it be interesting if the parasite is monitoring that sugar to know when it has moved into a fly, because when there's lots of sugar, the parasite thinks 'I'm in a mammal,' and when there's no sugar, the parasite thinks 'oh, I'm in a fly'," "We found that if you take the parasites and remove glucose nearly completely, they're still alive, which was: A, very surprising because they're so reliant on the sugar; but B, they also then quickly changed into the form that can live in the fly" External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "That's the first step in understanding that pathway and trying to confuse the parasite with drugs later," External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "The problem really is that in animals it's unchecked, and it has a really catastrophic effect on agriculture and those pursuits in sub-Saharan Africa," External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "We want to exploit this new understanding," External link

newsmedical Wednesday, November 21, 2018 10:25:00 AM CET

James Morris said: "There are a number of questions about how the parasite grows and develops in the fly and then gets transmitted to humans and other mammals," External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "One of the key things that happens is that, as the parasite is floating around in (mammalian) blood, it perceives its neighbors and says 'oh, there are a lot of us,' and becomes a different form that is ready to go into a fly, if the fly were to happen to bite that person," "That form that's ready for life in the fly doesn't grow - it's not a growing form - it's really sitting there, waiting to be taken up by a fly. Once it passes into the fly, though, it begins to grow again. It becomes a form that can live in the fly, and that's the insect-stage form, or procyclic form" External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "What has been a mystery, and still is a mystery, is how the parasite really knows where it is," "It turns out that if you take the form that lives in the fly and inject it into a mammal, it is killed instantly by the mammal's immune system. So, the parasite really has to do an excellent job of recognizing its environment" External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "We've always suspected the sugar was the cause, but it's been hard to prove," External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "We felt, wouldn't it be interesting if the parasite is monitoring that sugar to know when it has moved into a fly, because when there's lots of sugar, the parasite thinks 'I'm in a mammal,' and when there's no sugar, the parasite thinks 'oh, I'm in a fly'," "We found that if you take the parasites and remove glucose nearly completely, they're still alive, which was: A, very surprising because they're so reliant on the sugar; but B, they also then quickly changed into the form that can live in the fly" External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "That's the first step in understanding that pathway and trying to confuse the parasite with drugs later," External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "The problem really is that in animals it's unchecked, and it has a really catastrophic effect on agriculture and those pursuits in sub-Saharan Africa," External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

James Morris said: "We want to exploit this new understanding," External link

eurekalert Tuesday, November 20, 2018 9:02:00 PM CET

Caleb Bupp said: "When that result came back, I’ll be honest with you, it didn’t mean anything to me because there was not a known condition or syndrome associated with this," "I let the family know that we had found this change. Maybe this was something. Maybe it wasn’t" External link

freep Thursday, September 27, 2018 3:32:00 PM CEST

Caleb Bupp said: "That’s when sort of the light bulb moment came," "It was like, Oh! My patient, her gene was involved with those polyamine things. ... Things shifted dramatically from that moment on" External link

freep Thursday, September 27, 2018 3:32:00 PM CEST

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