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Wednesday, November 21, 2018

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Patrick Rafter said: “When we say iron is recycled in the system more efficiently than other elements, it doesn’t sound like this big, profound statement, but for those of us who have been studying these communities, it’s actually a very important insight into how the system works, how marine plant life functions in the ocean,” “This microbial community has figured out a way to fertilize itself with iron” External link

news-uci Tuesday, November 13, 2018 10:17:00 PM CET

Patrick Rafter said: “What happens in a decade or a century or a million years?” “Our model proves that if you change the rate at which waters are brought up to the surface, you can allow for more or less iron recycling and self-fertilization by phytoplankton. And then you get more nitrogen consumption and, ultimately, more of this plant growth that can affect the ocean/atmosphere partitioning of carbon dioxide – which impacts the global climate” External link

news-uci Tuesday, November 13, 2018 10:17:00 PM CET

Frida Bengtsson said: “2018 offered the Commission a historic opportunity to create the largest protected area on Earth in the Weddell Sea, backed by 22 of 25 of its members at the meeting, and nearly three million people worldwide. Instead, it allowed three countries to undermine negotiations,” External link

mercopress Monday, November 5, 2018 9:41:00 AM CET

Chris Johnson said: “An MPA off the Antarctic Peninsula would protect critical habitats for iconic species including penguins, whales, seals, seabirds, and Antarctic krill a keystone species in the Southern Ocean food web,” External link

mercopress Monday, November 5, 2018 9:41:00 AM CET

Michael Fox said: "This paper is the first to provide robust evidence for such a simple premise -- that corals eat more where there is more food," External link

sciencedaily Saturday, October 20, 2018 5:46:00 AM CEST

Michael Fox said: "This is not just something that's happening in the central Pacific, it's a pattern that holds on coral reefs across numerous ocean basins, from the Red Sea to the Caribbean," "What we now have is a map of potentially more resilient coral reefs. If these corals are relying more on planktonic food, perhaps they can recover from coral bleaching events faster" External link

sciencedaily Saturday, October 20, 2018 5:46:00 AM CEST

Gareth Williams said: "We wanted to develop a method that would allow people to predict coral feeding strategies for their reef system without having to do all this themselves, so we turned to satellite technology to help us," External link

sciencedaily Saturday, October 20, 2018 5:46:00 AM CEST

Michael Fox said: "This paper is the first to provide robust evidence for such a simple premise - that corals eat more where there is more food," External link

eurekalert Thursday, October 18, 2018 7:55:00 PM CEST

Michael Fox said: "This is not just something that's happening in the central Pacific, it's a pattern that holds on coral reefs across numerous ocean basins, from the Red Sea to the Caribbean," "What we now have is a map of potentially more resilient coral reefs. If these corals are relying more on planktonic food, perhaps they can recover from coral bleaching events faster" External link

eurekalert Thursday, October 18, 2018 7:55:00 PM CEST

Gareth Williams said: "We wanted to develop a method that would allow people to predict coral feeding strategies for their reef system without having to do all this themselves, so we turned to satellite technology to help us," External link

eurekalert Thursday, October 18, 2018 7:55:00 PM CEST

Patrick Rafter said: “When we say iron is recycled in the system more efficiently than other elements, it doesn’t sound like this big, profound statement, but for those of us who have been studying these communities, it’s actually a very important insight into how the system works, how marine plant life functions in the ocean,” “This microbial community has figured out a way to fertilize itself with iron” External link

news-uci Thursday, September 13, 2018 11:24:00 PM CEST

Patrick Rafter said: “What happens in a decade or a century or a million years?” “Our model proves that if you change the rate at which waters are brought up to the surface, you can allow for more or less iron recycling and self-fertilization by phytoplankton. And then you get more nitrogen consumption and, ultimately, more of this plant growth that can affect the ocean/atmosphere partitioning of carbon dioxide – which impacts the global climate” External link

news-uci Thursday, September 13, 2018 11:24:00 PM CEST

Patrick Rafter said: “When we say iron is recycled in the system more efficiently than other elements, it doesn’t sound like this big, profound statement, but for those of us who have been studying these communities, it’s actually a very important insight into how the system works, how marine plant life functions in the ocean,” “This microbial community has figured out a way to fertilize itself with iron” External link

news-uci Thursday, August 23, 2018 3:45:00 AM CEST

Patrick Rafter said: “What happens in a decade or a century or a million years?” “Our model proves that if you change the rate at which waters are brought up to the surface, you can allow for more or less iron recycling and self-fertilization by phytoplankton. And then you get more nitrogen consumption and, ultimately, more of this plant growth that can affect the ocean/atmosphere partitioning of carbon dioxide – which impacts the global climate” External link

news-uci Thursday, August 23, 2018 3:45:00 AM CEST

Noah Diffenbaugh says: “The emphasis on marine heatwaves is really motivated by the recognition that the same kinds of extremes can happen in the ocean as on land,” External link

scientificamerican Saturday, August 18, 2018 4:47:00 PM CEST

Kelly Sutherland said: "The last few years have been relatively warm," External link

sciencedaily Friday, July 20, 2018 5:25:00 PM CEST

Kelly Sutherland said: "The last few years have been relatively warm," External link

eurekalert Friday, July 20, 2018 3:54:00 PM CEST

Dan Warren concludes: "Many studies have shown that rapid changes in food webs bring about a loss of biodiversity in an ecosystem. In addition, we now know from our study that the hithero circadian rhythms have been major players in shaping the fish brains. It stands to reason that besides short-term changes to food webs these disturbances may also drive neurological changes in the long run which consequences are hard to predict" External link

leibniz-gemeinschaft Wednesday, July 18, 2018 12:29:00 PM CEST

Patrick Rafter said: “When we say iron is recycled in the system more efficiently than other elements, it doesn’t sound like this big, profound statement, but for those of us who have been studying these communities, it’s actually a very important insight into how the system works, how marine plant life functions in the ocean,” “This microbial community has figured out a way to fertilize itself with iron” External link

news-uci Tuesday, June 5, 2018 2:53:00 AM CEST

Patrick Rafter said: “What happens in a decade or a century or a million years?” “Our model proves that if you change the rate at which waters are brought up to the surface, you can allow for more or less iron recycling and self-fertilization by phytoplankton. And then you get more nitrogen consumption and, ultimately, more of this plant growth that can affect the ocean/atmosphere partitioning of carbon dioxide – which impacts the global climate” External link

news-uci Tuesday, June 5, 2018 2:53:00 AM CEST

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