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Friday, July 21, 2017

4:43:00 PM CEST

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Ken Johnson says: “Integrated, non-antibiotic fire blight programs use the disease cycle to time the sequence of materials to target phases of pathogen activity during the season,” “While a given material alone may not be sufficient to manage fire blight by itself, a combination of materials at the right timings can provide control similar to or better than antibiotics” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “In a just-planted orchard, the chance of infection is greatly reduced by removing blossoms (by hand or lime sulfur thinning),” “Many organic growers successfully use the blossom removal method to prevent fire blight from developing in secondary blooms on their young pears and apples” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “The decision to use a biological material such as Blossom Protect is strategic and made independent of weather-based risk determinations. It should be applied after the last lime sulfur thinning spray (a one-day interval is sufficient),” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “Generally, soluble copper materials show higher efficacy than Bacillus-based biorationals, but the soluble coppers pose a greater risk of causing fruit russeting, the severity of which is dependent on cultivar-sensitivity and environment,” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “Long bloom periods with untidy endings are especially prone to infection because the fire blight pathogen can build to very high populations when given this additional time,” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “In organic programs, where biological materials are important components, spray applications based only on the model warnings will likely be too late to achieve effective control,” “Biologicals need to grow their populations on the flowers before fire blight pathogen cells arrive in order to be competitive. This may take two to four days. Additionally, by integrating multiple preventative materials, we are able to target the pathogen at each stage of its life cycle and gain overall better control” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “Soluble coppers should be applied when conditions promote drying of the material,” “At least in one case, the yeast material, Blossom Protect, has also been implicated as a cause of fruit russetting in a high humidity environment. As a general rule, russet risk is higher in smooth skin pears than in apples. And, in higher humidity areas, more reliance needs to be placed on fruit-safe materials” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Ken Johnson says: “Damaged scions on resistant rootstock are much more likely to survive and regrow than die from a girdling rootstock infection,” External link

growingproduce Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:12:00 PM CEST

Keith Wood said: “I always start with the species,” External link

denverpost Friday, June 16, 2017 9:08:00 AM CEST

Keith Wood said: “We’re asking people to come up with a plan,” External link

denverpost Friday, June 16, 2017 9:08:00 AM CEST

Paul Ward said: "We want to bring the French, European-style apple here, not something close or similar like hybrids," External link

journalnow Saturday, March 18, 2017 5:52:00 AM CET

Paul Ward said: "We're really trying to do something for the family and Marvin's family and for the community that will be sustainable, that could really add an extra gear to the apple industry here by bringing in apples that are strictly cider variety apples, no different than we did with vinifera," External link

journalnow Saturday, March 18, 2017 5:52:00 AM CET

Paul Ward said: "We don't care if they have spots on them," External link

journalnow Saturday, March 18, 2017 5:52:00 AM CET

Paul Ward said: "We're not trying to prove something to somebody," "If you can grow things in Europe you can grow them here. It may take us a little bit of ironing out, but we want those varieties here" External link

journalnow Saturday, March 18, 2017 5:52:00 AM CET

Paul Ward said: "We will find the varieties and bring them back here one way or another, whether it takes that trip or another trip, we will do that, because it's no different saying we're going to go get some French vinifera over here. We just want to make it more plentiful to where it can be more widespread," "Hopefully in the long haul, you're not going to have everybody push up their apple trees and put cider apples in, but if you can take.20-percent of your land, 10-percent of your land and make five times the profit off that land, that helps keep you sustainable" External link

journalnow Saturday, March 18, 2017 5:52:00 AM CET

Paul Ward said: "We're trying to really push the envelope on high-quality, high-end agricultural products that are produced here in North Carolina," External link

journalnow Saturday, March 18, 2017 5:52:00 AM CET

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