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Saturday, November 18, 2017

7:25:00 AM CET

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Dave Goulson says: “Flying insects make up the bulk of life on Earth. About two-thirds of all species we know are insects,” “They pollinate more than 80 percent of all the plant species on Earth, so if we lose the flying insects we will lose all the flowers on Earth — literally all of them. Flowers evolved to attract insects, that's why we have them. Three-quarters of our crops need pollinating by flying insects. So, we’d have a world without most fruit and vegetables” External link

globalpost Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:26:00 AM CET

Dave Goulson says: “Most birds at some stage of their life cycle eat insects. Almost all reptiles, amphibians, aquatic fish, bats, lots of small mammals — all depend on insects. So, essentially, take away the insects and everything else is going to collapse,” External link

globalpost Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:26:00 AM CET

Dave Goulson says (about Dave Goulson): "things weren't going well,” but they had no idea just how dramatic the declines have been until they saw these numbers, Goulson explains. Many scientists have pointed to the use of neonicotinoid insecticides starting in the 1980s to explain the decline in insect population, but Goulson says we must look at the broader picture. “Essentially, the way we grow food these days makes the environment completely hostile to more or less all forms of life,” he says. “It isn't just neonicotinoids. We grow these huge monocultures of crops — great big fields — which, typically in Europe, get about 20 different pesticides applied to them each crop cycle, including maybe four or five different insecticides, a whole bunch of fungicides, things to kill slugs, herbicides to control the weeds. So, there's just no scope for anything to survive there apart from the crop. If we cover the landscape in fields like that, then we probably shouldn't be surprised when we see wildlife disappearing”. Neonicotinoids have gotten a lot of attention because they are particularly toxic to bees. Just three-billionths of a gram of a neonicotinoid will kill a honeybee and farmers apply hundreds of thousands of kilos of them to the landscape every year. What’s more, these chemicals are turning up in unexpected places, including the pollen and nectar of wildflowers. A recent study showed that 75 percent of honey samples taken from all over the world contain neonicotinoids. “Basically, if you're a bee anywhere in the world, the chances are your food contains neurotoxins that will kill you at really tiny doses, and that surely can't be a good thing,” Goulson says. Other farming chemicals are just as bad, including organophosphates (many of which are now banned) and fungicides. Fungicides, which one would think have no effect on flying insects, knock out the detoxification mechanism of bees, so, “although the fungicide itself isn't poisonous, if an insect is simultaneously exposed to a fungicide and an insecticide, the insecticide … can be up to a thousand times more toxic,” Goulson explains. Herbicides designed to get rid of weeds also eliminate nearby flowering plants, so, “although they may or may not be directly poisonous to the bees, if the herbicides get rid of their food, that's just as bad," External link

globalpost Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:26:00 AM CET

Dave Goulson says: “they all require buy-in from significant numbers of people,” “One or two environmentalists like me banging on isn't going to do anything. We need the majority of people on Earth to change their ways, and that's a pretty difficult thing to achieve” External link

globalpost Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:26:00 AM CET

Scott Stein says: “In corn, if you go back to the yield increases over time you’re talking between a $450 and $500 increase in incremental revenue associated with the footprint a bag of seed covers,” External link

agprofessional Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:52:00 PM CET

Ken Young said: “There are many elements to crop protection that we all need to understand, including what is in the tool box now, what we need in the future, and how best to use these tools,” External link

seedquest Tuesday, November 14, 2017 4:51:00 PM CET

Catherine Hill said: “We need to think very carefully about what their roles are and perhaps we might try an alternative approach which is to prevent the mosquito-transmitting diseases but not necessarily killing or eliminating it from the environment. It has been suggested that removing mosquitos from certain environments could have catastrophic effects on the food chain,” External link

wishtv Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:40:00 PM CET

Catherine Hill added: “We are on a hunt for a new class of insecticides to control mosquitos and this is work that is being done around the globe so I would say it’s a desperate need,” External link

wishtv Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:40:00 PM CET

Christy Morrissey conclude: «Quello che ci ha sorpreso è stato quanto siano stati sensibili e rapidi gli effetti, in particolaredel l’imidacloprid. Gli uccelli hanno mostrato una significativa perdita di massa corporea e segni di avvelenamento acuto (letargia e perdita di appetito). Anche i test sulla migrazione hanno mostrato che gli uccelli erano completamente prib vi di orientamento o che cambiavano il loro orientamento verso nord» External link

greenreport Tuesday, November 14, 2017 7:49:00 AM CET

Bart Caron zegt: “Is zo’n massale vernietiging wel nodig” External link

vilt Thursday, November 9, 2017 10:25:00 AM CET

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